This story is about those of us with whom life just happens. It takes place when the connection between cause and consequence is no longer coherent.  I am documenting a naïve visual subculture of a public space, which has become widely spread throughout Ukraine after a fall of the Soviet Union faced globalization.

Rafal Milach - Black sea of concrete

 

The fertile Ukraine – Hitler dreamt of it but it fell prey to Stalin. It was him and the likes who planted this land. They did what they could. They are long gone but the fertile land of Ukraine continues to yield its crop – subsequent lumps of concrete. Its surface is covered with cracks and rust-colored patches but it is still firmly set in the ground.

Two thirds of the Crimean population are dependent on the tourism industry. For many years, the Black Sea has been attracting the attention of visitors from across the region. After the annexation of the peninsula, however, tourism plunged into a deep crisis.

A Hannover based photographer Moritz Küstner has been tempted by the Eastern Europe for a long time. He is curious about the influences of the Soviet Union’s collapse on a life of different generations. He started learning Russian already at school following his fascination with the region. Initially he was interested in the annexation of Crimea as so but later focused on the destiny of a minority group leaving on the peninsula – Crimean Tatars.